Badag

Had a lovely afternoon in Trianaid getting to know some of the residents and carers. I took along a range of local books and photos. Many of these were based around the theme of planting and feannagan (lazy beds). These included photos of cutting the seaweed for fertilizer and the tools used in the process. Someone had been told that the cas-chrom (foot plough) was invented in Grimsay by the boat builders who could turn their hands to anything. Other areas in Uist such as Baleshare didn’t need the foot plough because the ground was soft so they just used a sliobhag (dibble). There were lots of nods and agreement about who the man in the photo was with the sgùird (canvas bag).

  

I took along a badag (home made feather brush). This was recognized immediately and the sweeping gestures demonstrated along with some detailed explanations of how they were used in their homes. Dusting flour, on the griddle pan while making scones, sweeping the top of the stove and some even used it for sweeping ashes away. The feathers were kept very clean because they were used for cooking. People mainly used hens feathers, or any feathers they had access to, bunched them together and tie them up with string. Voila! A great use of local materials and easy to make, I might start a campaign to ‘Bring back the Badag’!

Other things I learned today;
The daffodils I brought along with the orange centre are actually Narcissus – a cousin of the daffodil.
A skinned otter would get you enough money for a night out at the dance.
Herbs are the best remedies for everything and it’s a gift to know how to use them.
Gannets will only eat fish they catch themselves.
Wild roses are the best.

Best offer of the day:
I’ll teach you how to make a creel we just need some bamboo and something to knit with.

The daffodils were hugely admired; ‘oh it’s daffodil time’, mmmm, lots of smelling and happy smiles ‘oh you’re the daffodil lady’, ‘are you going to leave them here?’

            

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