Science Ceilidh week

Lewis Hou from Science Ceilidh was here in October and we held twelve events together:

Isles FM
Gaelic class
Hospital ceilidh
Blar Buidhe
Solas, Grianan, Ardseielach groups,
An Lantair open mic
Stornoway Library
Grinneabhat
Museum traditional songs event
Friday Ceilidh at the Retirement Centre
Live streaming event
Western Isles Hospital staff event in the Education Centre
Planning meetings in An Lanntair, the Library and at the airport for future events with Fun Palaces.

Lewis is a Neuroscientist and Educator, working with Science Ceilidh, which won Hands Up For Trad Community Music Organisation of the Year 2018. The events that we held here introduced the brain, the size of it, how different parts of the brain physically change relating to movement and how scanning picks up blood flow to different areas of the brain. We looked at how music impacts on the brain and how learning a second language at any age, even another language very similar to one that we already speak, positively supports the brain to recover better from stroke and perhaps protect the brain for some years from some of the impacts of dementia.

Research and resources can be found on the Science Ceilidh website and Lewis Hou (contactable through the website) is happy to hear and respond to your questions if you would like to get in touch.

Some of our project work this year is relating to research and academic partnerships, so this was an important collaboration to undertake for that reason but mostly, it was brilliant fun! We danced the ‘Canadian Brain Dance’ and enjoyed some wonderful traditional music.

Some of the hilarious comments reflected the fun of the sessions ‘ohh this must be a Niseach brain’ ‘is your brain really that small?’ ‘oh my brain is MUCH bigger than that, I am such an intelligent lady’.

One particularly moving moment was where a young man attending a day centre was able to perform to and entertain the others in the group, singing along with Lewis. He clearly experienced a lot of enjoyment from singing, dancing and entertaining his friends and neighbours, who enjoyed his contribution enormously, with smiles, laughter and joining in. The intergenerational aspect of this group was also wonderful, with ages from teens to nineties, all engaging with the science aspects as well as the music and dancing.