Wee Studio Podcast Recording

We had a massively industrious recording session today at Wee Studio – three podcasts in one session.
One is for the forthcoming memory box relating to moorland. It has a song about the shielings  by Maggie and the words read as a poem by Donald Saunders.
The next podcast is about the Herring Girls and Maggie explains the story of the song and then sings it (magically).
The final podcast is the second of our Gaelic Without Trying series, designed to support carers to learn Gaelic by absorption.
They will appear shortly for downloading.
Because of the detail about how songs were learned and remembered, this will be a useful resource for academics researching bilingualism and oral traditions across the islands as well.

 

Beàrnaraigh Loch a Ròag by Chrissie Bell Maclean

Blog 3 Chrissie B Maclean

Chrissie Bell Maclean had her 89th birthday this month. Memories of summer holidays with her granny in Great Bernera in the 1930s, is the theme of her poetry Beàrnaraigh Loch a Ròag

Local singer John MacDonald, very taken with the lyrics, created a melody and hopes to feature the track on his next recording.

This is a delightful poem about Great Bernera and its landmarks. Chrissie Bell Maclean has a real gift for poetry.

Beàrnaraigh Loch a Ròag

Air madainn mhoch ’s an t-sàmhradh
Nuair bhios druchd air bhàrr an fheòir
’S a chì mi ghrìan ag èirigh
Anns an iarmailt gòrm gun sgòth
Chan eil àite san t-saoghal seo
A chì mi bhios nas bòidhche
’S mi fuasgladh mo shùilean
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

’S iomadh àite tha àlainn
Anns na h-Eileannan a Tuath
Ach ’s ann an Eilean Bheàrnaraigh
Is tric a tha mo smuain,
Tha sonas is toil-inntinn ann
Is binne guth na h-eòin
A’ seinn air bhàrr nan craobhan
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

Ged tha sìan nam bliadhnachan
Ag atharrach gach nì
’S an aois a deanamh dealachadh
Agus sgaradh anns an tìr
Bithidh ’n caoimhneas is an càirdeas
A chaoidh ga chumail beò
’S gach cnòc is gleann cur fàilte orm
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

’S iomadh latha àlainn,
Ghabh mi an t-aiseag air an t-shàil
Gu Rudha Glas an Circibost
Ann an sinn bha m’àite tàmh
Gun tug mi spèis nach dealaich rium
’S cha cheannaicheadh an t-òr
An t-eireachdas san caoimhneas
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

Dh’fhàg mi làrach chasan
Anns gach cnoc is lèann is tòm
Bho acarsaid an Dùbh Thob
Gu taighean Barraglom
Suas gu Mullach Hacleit
Far ’m b’eòlach mi nam òig
’S a-mach gu baile Bhreacleit
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

Nuair thig mi mach gu Bostadh
Far bheil luchd mo ghaoil nan tàmh
The tobhtaichean ar sinnsearan
An-diugh le feur a fàs
Tha sin na adhbhar smaoineachadh
Gum bheil ar beatha mar cheò
Air latha breàgha sàmhraidh
Ann am Beàrnaraigh Loch à Ròag

Chriosaidh NicIleathainn Chrissiebell MacLean

Interview, transcription and introduction by Maggie Smith

Word Collage Poem

I Don’t Know You ..

I don’t know you
But a Siarach by the blàs
My mother was from Carloway
We had cousins over your way in Keose.

They would come to the communions over the moor
Twice a year, rain hail or shine.
And stayed the entire week.
We gave them room and lay in the barn.

My father went to Uig to buy a cow once
He walked all the way to Valtos and back in one day
Oatmeal when the sun was at its highest point
And water from the moorland stream.

My father, he was in the war with a man from Lochs
Crossbost -Alasdair Mor a big man
He became one of the Oatmeal Monuments
Then the Clyde Trust -The Skye Navy.

I prefer the land and the sky myself
The moor between Tolsta and Ness
I was a herder when I left school at 14
2 shillings a ewe we got to keep
Then from treacherous bogs and cliffs

I can still walk that moor today
Know it like the back of my hand

Oh well it so lovely that you came to see me
I hope it is kippers or salt herring tonight
No fresh fish nowadays
We were brought up on fish.

See and bring me some haddies the next time
Don’t be long till you call again
I just knew I knew you when you came in.

Maggie Smith