Wee Studio Podcast Recording

We had a massively industrious recording session today at Wee Studio – three podcasts in one session.
One is for the forthcoming memory box relating to moorland. It has a song about the shielings  by Maggie and the words read as a poem by Donald Saunders.
The next podcast is about the Herring Girls and Maggie explains the story of the song and then sings it (magically).
The final podcast is the second of our Gaelic Without Trying series, designed to support carers to learn Gaelic by absorption.
They will appear shortly for downloading.
Because of the detail about how songs were learned and remembered, this will be a useful resource for academics researching bilingualism and oral traditions across the islands as well.

 

Hand Memory – by Jon Macleod

Hand memory pdf

net mending blurredScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 09.30.28Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 09.30.38Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 09.30.47Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 09.31.06Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 09.31.12

images: Net mending session at Blar Buidhe, Carding wool at Harris house, Knitting pattern, Anne Campbell (Garenin) Milking – using fuigheagan (waste wool from tweed weaving) to tie the tail out of the way …., Setting nets off Gallan Head, Ciosan.

Hand Memory

Building on earlier sessions with people living with dementia that explored traditional skills and the role of ‘hand memory’ we have created further sessions for eliciting memories as well as creating opportunities for haptic stimulation, that may link to life knowledge of work tools, craft skills and techniques such as creel and basket making, knitting, carding and spinning wool, net mending fishing and tweed weaving. To explore this in greater depth we have collaborated on a joint funding proposal with Dr.Stephanie Bunn, Senior lecturer in Anthropology (specializing in Material Culture) at St. Andrews University. This new project looks at ‘eliciting oral histories and ‘hand-memories’ as a means of co-designing supportive, inclusive and locally distinct communities for people living with dementia as well as providing research that will feed into developing new innovative design tools.

Another objective is to exchange knowledge of basketry practice in memory work with An Lanntair’s experience of placing oral traditions at the centre of our approach to local history-making and recording. We will draw on local familiarity with basketry to elicit both oral and embodied memories from community elders, who are often the only members of communities now to retain such skills. An Lanntair’s experience with orality and dementia will in turn enhance the work with other communities in the project, along with providing oral material which will enrich the collection at Lewis’s Museum nan Eilean. 

Dr.Bunn’s previous project ‘Woven Communities’ looked at basketry, memory, and embodied thinking and grew out of an initiative and collaboration between a group of Scottish basketmakers, the Scottish Basketmakers Circle whose aim was to collect together and document all the diverse research conducted about Scottish vernacular basketry, learning skills from regional practitioners, researching in their local communities, surveying basket-related plant ecology and visiting museum collections and archives;

“There is a wealth of information which comes forth when people see you making baskets – often they are eager to correct you just to start with and let you know you are doing something wrong. Then many memories come flooding back.”- Liz Balfour, (Woven Communities Project Partner).

One focus of the new project will look at re-discovering local skills and knowledge by hosting practical reminiscence events and hand memory exercises. We will follow a basket making process all the way through, from gathering weaving materials, processing them and then weaving a specific vessel such as a ‘Ciosan’. This was ‘a coiled basket made from sea-bent (marram grass), or sometimes straw. The coils are stitched together using twine made from rush, marram, even split willow or bramble, or bought twine’. Its function was to hold oat or barley meal.

Shetland

I’m on Shetland for Up Helly Aa this week, checking out project-related teams, projects and organisations.

I checked out the Mareel Cafe before my meetings, for my first Matcha tea. I felt healthier just looking at it!

I loved the Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Resource centre. It has a lovely kitchen for meetings around the table. I met Alan Murdoch, Dementia Services Nurse Manager, Ann Williamson and the community activities organiser. We had a brilliant discussion about Faro and the differences and similarities between island dementia services. I presented the project and we discussed developing the ideas more widely.

In the afternoon, I met Camille from the Scottish Health Council and we discussed the project and Health Improvement, we also shared ideas about how to use the voices of the people involved in our project to inform policymakers.